Last edited by Meztisho
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of Brain and behaviour in cephalopods. found in the catalog.

Brain and behaviour in cephalopods.

Martin John Wells

Brain and behaviour in cephalopods.

by Martin John Wells

  • 368 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Heinemann .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesStudies in biology
The Physical Object
Pagination171p.,ill.,21cm
Number of Pages171
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21741688M

This book fills that gap, accentuating the varied and fascinating aspects of cognition across the group. Starting with the brain, learning and memory, Part I looks at early learning, memory acquisition and cognitive development in modern cephalopods/5(4). Although this book is written with a scientific audience in mind, cephalopods admirers of all types will find this work engaging.' Shelley Adamo, Dalhousie University, Canada 'Cephalopods are undoubtedly among the most fascinating group of animals on the planet, varying enormously in appearance, behaviour, and ecology.

In cephalopods the eye develops from the endoderm, the inner embryonic cell layer. They develop as a bulb growing from the brain. The lens is built separately. A line of evolution can be shown from the simple pit shaped eye of ancient snails over the pinhole camera eye of a nautilus towards the lens eye of an octopus.   This book fills that gap, accentuating the varied and fascinating aspects of cognition across the group. Starting with the brain, learning and memory, Part I looks at early Cephalopods are generally regarded as the most intelligent group among the invertebrates/5(5).

About this book. Coverage includes fully labelled illustrations of central nervous systems of more than 50 cephalopods, fully labelled illustrations of the sense organs, life histories and reproductive habits of many cephalopods, illustrations of many morphological features, systematic survey of the families of the class. Cephalopods usually have large and mobile eyes with which they constantly scan their environment. The eyes of cephalopods are single-chamber eyes which show resemblance to vertebrate eyes. However there are marked differences such as the cephalopod eye having an everted retina instead of an inverted retina found in vertebrates.


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Brain and behaviour in cephalopods by Martin John Wells Download PDF EPUB FB2

There are about species of cephalopods (including the cuttlefishes, squids, octopods, and the chambered nautilus) living throughout the seas of the world. They are considered to be the most highly evolved marine invertebrates and possess elaborate sense organs, large brains and complex behavior.

This book examines such behavior, summarizing field and laboratory data 5/5(1). Additional Physical Format: Online version: Wells, M.J. Brain and behaviour in cephalopods. Stanford, Calif., Stanford Univ. Press [] (OCoLC) COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Brain and Behaviour in Cephalopods [M. Wells] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Description: Focusing on comparative cognition in cephalopods, this book illuminates the wide range of mental function in this often overlooked group. tweet; Brain And Behaviour In Cephalopods.

Author by: Martin John Wells Languange: en Publisher by: Format Available: PDF, ePub, Mobi Total Read: 37 Total Download: File Size: 51,6 Mb. Cambridge Core - Zoology - Cephalopod Behaviour - by Roger T. Hanlon. Brain and Behavior in Cephalopods Article (PDF Available) in The Yale journal of biology and medicine 35(4) January with 99 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

A scuba-diving philosopher of science explores the wonder of cephalopods, smart and playful creatures who live outside the brain-body divideAuthor: Philip Hoare. Brain and behaviour in cephalopods. -- Author: Wells, Martin John. Publication info: Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, [].

16 rows    With their large brains, elaborate sense organs and complex. This is not another account of the lives of cephalopods in general—following on from Lane’s Kingdom of the Octopus: the life history of the Cephalopoda (London, ), Wells’s Brain and Behaviour in Cephalopods (London, ) and Hanlon and Messenger’s Cephalopod Behaviour [Cambridge, ( references)].Cited by: 1.

Cephalopod, any member of the class Cephalopoda of the phylum Mollusca, a small group of highly advanced and organized, exclusively marine animals. The octopus, squid, cuttlefish, and chambered nautilus are familiar representatives.

Learn more about cephalopods in this article. Cambridge Core - Animal Behaviour - Cephalopod Cognition - edited by Anne-Sophie Darmaillacq. First, the linkage of brain to behaviour seen in lateralization, sleep and through a developmental context is similar to that of mammals and birds.

Second, cephalopods, especially octopuses, are heavily dependent on learning in response to both visual and tactile cues, and may have domain generality and form simple by: Living Fossils Have Long- And Short-term Memory Despite Lacking Brain Structures Of Modern Cephalopods; M.J.

Wells (). Brain and Behaviour in Cephalopods. Heinemann. Roger T. Hanlon & John B. Messenger (). Cephalopod Behaviour. Cambridge University Press. Marion Nixon and John Z. Young (). The Brains and Livees of Cephalopods. Borrelli, G. Fiorito, in Learning and Memory: A Comprehensive Reference, General Organization of the Brain.

In cephalopods, the ganglia recruited to form the central nervous system may be considered homologous to the labial, buccal, cerebral, pedal, pleural, and visceral ganglia of gastropod ry to what occurs in the typical molluscan design.

Inappropriate The list (including its title or description) facilitates illegal activity, or contains hate speech or ad hominem attacks on a fellow Goodreads member or author. Spam or Self-Promotional The list is spam or self-promotional.

Incorrect Book The list contains an incorrect book (please specify the title of the book). Details *. Cephalopods are widely regarded as the most intelligent of the invertebrates, and have well developed senses and large brains (larger than those of gastropods).

The nervous system of cephalopods is the most complex of the invertebrates and their brain-to-body-mass ratio falls between that of endothermic and ectothermic vertebrates.: 14 Captive cephalopods have also Class: Cephalopoda, Cuvier,   With their large brains, elaborate sense organs and complex behaviour, cephalopods are among the world's most highly evolved invertebrates.

This second edition summarises the wealth of exciting new research data stemming from over five hundred papers published since the first volume appeared/5(29). Behaviour. Cephalopods are unique among the invertebrates in the degree of cephalization and cerebralization attained.

The uniting of the major ganglionic centres of the central nervous system constitutes a brain of considerable complexity. cephalopod | Definition, Etymology, Species, &. An expert scuba diver, he studies the behaviour of cephalopods across the globe and has showcased his research in over forty television programmes, including for the BBC, NOVA, Discovery Channel and National Geographic.

John B. Messenger is a Zoologist interested in sensory physiology and the neural bases of animal : Roger T. Hanlon. How that might differ to humans’ is the subject of his book The coconut octopus is one of the few cephalopods known to exhibit the .Summary.

The cephalopod nervous system is the most complex of any invertebrate nervous system. Although species-specific differences exist, its high level of complexity almost certainly is due to the cephalopods’ very active, fast-moving, predatory life style, and their complex behavior and extreme flexibility of response to different environmental by: